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Road to Green: Are You Focused on the Future?

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Everyone acknowledges the rapid changes taking place in the Heavy Duty Aftermarket but are you addressing the following?

  • The new business measurement which includes revenue breakdowns involving a minimum of 3 labor categories
  • Your shop site efficiency measurement weekly and monthly
  • Your average billed hours per R/O weekly, monthly and year to date
  • Your sales mix between aftermarket and dealer parts
  • The total hours of training completed for each tech for the year
  • The actual cost per billed hour for the shop on a monthly basis with a year to date average

Those are just some basics as the new aftermarket demands new awareness which in essence means many HD owners must relearn their business to maximize net income. It has been proven that the average HD shop is missing on average $35,000 net profit per bay per year out of the current business coming through the door. The question that must be asked is “where is it in your shop?”

The average HD has a lot of work to do to understand the new aftermarket that is rapidly arriving and how to implement the changes required and building a solid Team culture responsible for the implementation.

If you are an HD shop owner who is not addressing the future and determined to hold on to the methods used over the last 10 years thinking you will be OK then ask yourself this question: Do you take out a minimum of $150,000 per year for my immediate Family, having the highest paid technicians in the marketplace with exceptional benefits and the shop still nets a minimum of 10% of gross sales? Will that remain valid for the next 3 years? If so, good for you. If not then it is time to rediscover the business opportunities that are in front of you today. Enrol yourself and your manager together into an HD shop specific Business Course. Procrastination is not an option.

AkzoNobel’s Heavy-duty 20 Group to Co-locate with HD Repair Forum

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The HD Repair Forum (HDRF) is pleased to announce that AkzoNobel has confirmed they will host their spring 20 Group meeting the week of April 9, in conjunction with the HD Repair Forum at the Fort Worth Hilton.

The HD Repair conference will take place Tuesday, April 10, and Wednesday, April 11, while the AkzoNobel 20 Group meeting will take place on Thursday, April 12. Heavy-duty collision repair professionals from across North America, will be in Fort Worth getting information on the latest updates on important industry issues and trends, while hearing about the latest technology, services, and training opportunities available to the market.

“AkzoNobel is an important company in the heavy-duty repair market and to have this group host a special meeting during the HD Repair Forum for their constituents is very exciting,” stated Brian Nessen, Director of the HD Repair Forum. “This decision supports the ongoing plan for industry collaboration and fits with the direction of the HD Repair Forum, to bring the heavy-duty repair industry together for education and networking.”

“We are looking forward to hosting this special meeting during the HD Repair Conference,” said Bob DuBreuil, Senior Services Consultant, AkzoNobel. “Many of our members plan to attend the event anyway, so this is a logical move for our 20 Group.”

Many other industry stakeholders, including truck manufacturers, equipment suppliers, insurance adjusters, and heavy-duty repair facility owners have already marked the premiere HD Repair Forum into their calendars.

Heavy- Duty Weekly Event Schedule:

Tuesday, April 10

7:00 AM Registration

8:00 AM-5:00 PM Conference

5:00-6:30 PM Reception

Wednesday, April 11

7:00 AM Registration

8:00 AM-4:30 PM Conference

Thursday, April 12-AkzoNobel 20 Group Meeting 

Sponsorship opportunities are available and can be found at http://hdrepairforum.com/sponsor

Registration is open at http://hdrepairforum.com/register

For more information about the conference, please visit www.hdrepairforum.com.

About the HD Repair Forum
Created as a dedicated resource for heavy-duty repair information for shop owners, managers, estimators, appraisers, insurance personnel, manufacturers, educators, and consultants. The HD Repair Forum offers a website, a newsletter, webinars and a conference that brings all industry stakeholders together. The HD Repair conference will take place April 10-11, 2018 in Fort Worth, TX with numerous classes and panels dedicated to education and problem solving.

For advertising, sponsorship, or event information, contact the HD Repair Forum team at:
HD Repair Forum

(713) 705-1512

22136 Westheimer Parkway, Suite 509

Katy TX 77450

 

For additional information, visit www.hdrepairforum.com

 

 

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Paint Booth Lighting for Better Quality Paint Jobs

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When considering what goes into a quality paint job, we often think of the quality of the prep job, airflow and filtration in the booth, skill of the painter and more. Although these factors are all important, another key factor is lighting. Great spray booth lighting is necessary for proper working conditions, and is especially important in the refinish world for accurate color matching and high-quality paint finishes.

Excellent paint booth lighting is made up of several components, including fixture placement and quantity, light quality, type of lens, lamps and ballast, and code compliance of the fixture.

Fixture Placement & Quantity

In order to achieve uniform, complete lighting, light fixtures must be strategically placed on the paint booth walls and ceiling. Paint booth engineers use lighting analysis to determine the number and placement of light fixtures for optimal brightness.

A paint booth’s brightness is measured in foot candles — the intensity of light in a given direction. An ordinary wax candle has the luminous intensity of 1 foot candle. The industry standard for paint booths is 100 to 150 foot candles at a three-foot height.

Light Quality & Color Matching

For paint refinishing jobs, color matching is critical. In order to accurately color match, the lighting in the paint booth should be as close as possible to natural daylight, which is the true “white” light. The quality of lighting can be measured by the Color Rendering Index (CRI), which rates the light’s ability to duplicate the entire visible spectrum.

The CRI is a scale of zero to 100, with the sun at 100. Anything over 90 CRI is considered full-spectrum lighting. When quality and color matching is important, higher CRI rated lamps should be used. Lamps with a CRI of 90 or above are often referred to as color-corrected lamps, and are commonly used in paint booths for accurate color matching.

Clear, Tempered Lens

The light fixture lens can also have an effect on the quality of the light it gives off. A clear tempered lens allows for clearer, more accurate lighting. Tempered glass is four to five times stronger than regular glass of equal size and thickness, for excellent durability in a high-production painting and curing environment. It’s also much clearer than wire reinforced glass, which used to be common in some paint booths. 

Types of Lamps – Fluorescent (T8/T5) and LED

 Most paint booths come standard with fluorescent T8 light bulbs, however, you may have the option to upgrade to LED T8 lamps as an energy-efficient alternative. LED lamps can offer significant energy savings — up to 40 percent when compared to traditional fluorescent 32W T8 system. Most T8 light fixtures can support either fluorescent or LED bulbs, making it easy to upgrade to LED bulbs in an existing paint booth. An alternative to T8, T5 light bulbs are often used in paint booths with tall ceilings, as they offer a higher output.

Energy-Efficient Dual Ballasts

Another way to save energy with your paint booth lighting is with dual ballasts. Dual ballast fixtures offer two levels of lighting. When less light is needed, such as during prep operations, you can save energy by using half of the lights. Full lighting can be easily restored for painting operations and detail work.

Safety and Code Compliance

While it is important for the paint booth as a whole to be code compliant, it is just as important for certain booth components, such as lighting, to comply with national, state and local regulations. When it comes to lighting, regulatory agencies require that booth light fixtures be approved for Class I, Division II, Groups A-D. By verifying your booth lighting meets these requirements, you can ensure worry-free planning and installation, and the safety of your employees, equipment and facility.

A Trusted Booth Manufacturer

Although all of these lighting factors are important to consider when purchasing a new truck refinish paint booth, the paint booth manufacturer and your local distributor should be able to help simplify the buying process for you. Look for a trusted, reliable booth manufacturer with engineers on staff. Booth lighting should be engineered for optimal brightness, color matching and energy efficiency, as well as meet code requirements. Better lighting in your paint booth can go a long way in achieving better quality paint finishes.

Road to Green: A 10% Increase in Shop Productivity Makes More Sense Than a 10% Discount on Supplier Parts

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Too many HD parts suppliers always approach the HD service shop owner discussing the parts price issue of what they offer, and then they wonder why the shop owner is only thinking about price and possible further discounts on parts.

Many HD service shops do not really understand the benefit to their business of a productivity increase in the bays. Our HD industry has always spoken about top line activity rather than bottom line focus. When the HD parts supplier brings additional value and helps shop management to understand this issue, it is amazing how the focus of the conversation can change, and for the better of both parties. Does your HD parts supplier bring HD shop Business Management courses to your area?

It is critical to understand that the HD shop is not in the commodity business like a parts supplier but rather they are in the knowledge business. The shop must diagnose the HD vehicle problem and set up the relationship with each client in order to obtain the proper labor hours billed to the client ensuring the vehicle is maintained in accordance with the manufacturer recommendations, is safe and reliable for the client and have the shop service levels exceed the client’s expectations.

One important number the HD service shop should know about their business which measures whether the shop is achieving the right HD vehicle maintenance service levels with each client is the average number of labor hours billed per repair order.

To calculate this number it is recommended that you take at least six months’ worth of labor sales. The longer the time frame measured, the more accurate the number.

First… take the closing number of the invoice and subtract the opening number. For example the closing number of the invoice at December 31 is 22474 and the opening number of the invoice on June 1 was 21872. The difference is 602 meaning that 602 RO’s have been written in the shop since June 1.

Second… add up the total dollar labor revenue billed in the shop from June 1 to December 31. For example, let’s assume the total labor dollars billed was $227,056 for the six month period.

Third… divide the total labor dollars billed by the labor rate of the shop. For example if the shop is charging $90 per hour, then $227,056 divided by $90 = 2,522.8 labor hours billed for the six month period.

Fourth…labor hours billed divided by the number of invoices written equals the average number of labor hours per invoice. In our example we would take 2,522.8 billed divided by 602 invoices written, equals an average of 4.2 labor hours billed per invoice.

The average HD shop in the marketplace is currently averaging 5.3 to 5.6 hours per invoice. The industry must achieve a productivity level average of 8 to 10 hours per invoice to provide the professional HD vehicle maintenance to the commercial client. That is the goal to be achieved.

The obvious question to be asked is “What is the affect on the shop’s gross profit and potential net profit if we can get a shop to increase their productivity by only ten percent to start?” In our example, this shop is averaging 100.3 invoices per month (602 RO’s written divided by 6 months) and averaging 4.2 hours of labor per RO at $90 per hour.

Without increasing the volume of RO’s written and keeping the labor rate at the same charge-out rate, if we increased productivity by 10 percent from 4.2 hours to 4.6 hours per invoice, the results to additional gross profit (and net profit) would be as follows:

                                                                                                  NEW              OLD

Average number of invoices written per month           100.3             100.3

Times average number of labor hours per invoice            4.6               4.2

Equals total labor hours billed per month                      461.4             421.3

Times the current hourly labor rate                                   $90               $90

Equals total labor revenue produced per month          $41,526         $37,917

 

The difference between the new productivity and old productivity is $3,609 PER MONTH!!!

This will create an additional $43,308 gross profit and net profit from labor revenue alone for the shop in one year.

These figures can become very significant as the internal processes to build billed hours moves forward. They represent a substantial additional amount of monies earned compared to any discount on parts could ever contribute to the shop bottom-line profitability. In addition to that we haven’t even accounted for any gross profit earned from the part sales that would be made as well with the increase in labor productivity.

Math is a very precise science. The numbers do not lie. Consider talking to your team about how to slow the shop processes down and increase productivity per vehicle rather than spinning everyone’s wheels trying to bring in more volume of HD vehicles into the bays and take a further parts discount from the supplier. Let’s teach the industry to work smarter, not harder.

This is only the tip of the ice-burg when it comes to understanding the affect of professional business management on an independent heavy duty maintenance and repair shop. The affect on true bottom line profitability is incredible. By adjusting the shops business measurements and the front counter processes, one can find a minimum of $160,000 to $250,000 in net profit with the current business coming through the door in an average 8 bay HD shop. How would that additional net income in your shop or everyone’s shop, change their business, their lifestyle, everyone’s stress levels and the independent sector of the heavy duty aftermarket industry?

Perhaps it is time for you to examine exactly what do you talk about with your team when they are looking at their routine with all heavy duty vehicles entering the bays?

Road to Green: HD Shop Business Management Skills Is a Development Process… Not Another Seminar or Sales Course

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Heavy Duty Shop operators from coast to coast are experiencing challenges like no other era ever seen before in our industry.

Consider the level of development of HD vehicle technology over the past five years.  Consider the change in vehicle service intervals.  Consider the cost of diagnostic equipment to even begin the process of entering and sustaining this profession. Consider the technical skill level required today to be on the shop floor.  Consider the uninformed HD client who doesn’t truly understand its complexity. Consider the change in vehicle sales mix with the dramatic increase of import vehicles and the decline of the North America brands. Consider the lack of supply of larger facilities which are required to provide the shop the space to hold more equipment then ever required before in the history of our industry to meet complexities of vehicle service. Consider  the longer period of time required to properly diagnose and service the vehicle to manufacturer recommended standards.

The shop business has changed drastically yet it is not being acknowledged properly within industry.  Every level of the industry still talks about the desire to drive more “sales”.  The commodity side of the industry has the loudest voice and spends the money on marketing that screams to HD shop owners “more activity”, “make more sales with our products and programs, and be price competitive”…………………………..the commodity side of the aftermarket does not seem to understand at all how the HD shop business level has really changed and the need to address the real shop issues called “productivity” and “sustained individual client relationships”. They seemingly give this issue lip service only, without substance supporting or backing up their words.

Step back and consider the following: The manufacturer, warehouse distributor, and part suppliers are in the commodity business and they require volume sales of their products to survive.  All their marketing displays their desired results.  The HD Service Provider, however, is in the knowledge business and does not require the commodities to survive to the same extent, but rather requires proper billed hours at the right rate to survive and prosper. The HD Service Provider owner is not getting exposed to, or taught, the real issues of his/her shop that ensure proper NET income is achieved and retained, allowing them to grow, prosper and enjoy a rewarding professional career.  Instead, shop owners are approached by the commodity side and sold on the idea to attend and listen to a presentation that is, 1, 2, or 3 hours, or a 1 or 2 day seminar that preaches more sales, more vehicles to service, more activity. These are “motivational” or pep talks only and do nothing to teach the shop owner proper business acumen and best business practices. The shop owner is never introduced to his/her own numbers and allowed to work with them and clearly understand what they mean.

This is an absolute tragedy within our industry.

Consider that high percentage of shop owners that have grade twelve level education as their last year of formal education.  From there, they worked very hard, payed the personal price of sacrifice, and achieved the designation of holding a Technician License.  They are knowledgeable about the HD vehicle and the best shops have a concerted effort in place to stay on top of this issue, however, one must ask, “Where were they taught how to read the balance sheet of their own business?  Where were they taught how to measure and manage their current business properly?  Where were they taught the difference between mark-up and gross profit?  Where were they taught the workings of shop efficiency and its effect on the bottom line?  Where were they taught how to manage gross profit and measure net profit?  Where were they taught how to create a shop team through personnel development? Where were they taught the costs of accounts receivable and the “cancer” it can give a business?”

The facts are, the average HD shop today is missing between $30,000 and $35,000 in NET INCOME per BAY per year from their lack of management of their CURRENT business coming through the door.  Independent Heavy Duty shops don’t need more vehicles to work on, they don’t need more “activity”………..they need to learn how to manage properly what they currently have.  If their business was managed correctly through the process of learning to develop best business practices and measure and manage “productivity” instead of chasing “activity”, HD suppliers in this country would be getting paid in full each month and at better margins! The shop owner and staff would enjoy a professional personal income as well as have the cash to move his/her business forward.

Parts Suppliers and WD’s tell me HD shop owners are not interested in business management.  This is true based on the fact Part Suppliers and WD’s sold seminars in the past and called them business management seminars or courses.  They in fact were not. They were sales courses.  This industry does not need another sales course. The Part Supplier and WD failed their customers!! The trust was and has been broken.  They sold the shop owners sales courses and seminars focusing on sales techniques making the shop busier through increased activity and selling more parts forcing shop owners to work harder and not smarter. SALES WENT UP BUT NET INCOME DID NOT.  The credibility of these Suppliers and WD’s has to be rebuilt.

Many HD shop owners, as licensed technicians are nervous about approaching the real issue of Shop Business Management on their own.  I’ve heard from them “I will not understand as I wasn’t that good at school Math and English”. “I’m a tech not a pencil pusher”, “I would embarrass myself”. “That’s why I have a bookkeeper because business management is nothing but numbers and paperwork that bean counters have to understand”. These reasons are seldom spoken to their supplier, ……..instead, they say to their supplier “it is too expensive”, or the big one…. “I don’t have time”,…. or “I don’t need another course”, or “no one can show me something I don’t already know”, or “that stuff isn’t worth it anyway”.  To all HD shop owners clinging to these “excuses”… wake up and do the math…….you bought yourself a job and you know it, and you are covered in debt that has increased your stress to undesirable levels which is affecting your family relationship. Do you want to do something about it or not????   

Understanding real shop Business Management is easier than you think, however you must work with it because it has not been part of your daily activity in your shop throughout your career.    If you are a HD shop owner and a technician YOU CAN GRASP AND UNDERSTAND PROPER BUSINESS MANAGEMENT!!!, however, the real question is “do you want to learn?” If you don’t want to learn, then KNOW ONE can help you and you should wind down your business and get out now while you can as the next three to five years are going to be challenging to say the least!!

If you do want to learn then plan the time now and enrol into a proper business course that is HD independent shop specific.  I’m confident, if the course is the right one you truly will enjoy it.

You did not create the current industry issues.  This is just reality today.  This business has changed and if you are going to be in it you must clearly understand the business management side of it.

    

Road to Green: Manage Your Working Day With Three Vital Rules

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Let’s face it many heavy duty shop owners have a tendency to overcomplicate their day-to-day function, which in turn can lead to a stressed, unprofitable, business.

It appears the longer you are actually in the HD Service business these days, the “messier”, “more cluttered” your personal day becomes. I hear things like “I’m personally just too busy”, or, “there is so much that I must do”, or, “I’ve got so much on my plate that I must handle”.

The fact is, this happens to every business owner/manager at some time, no matter how good they seem to appear on the outside.

Start to deal with this situation by re-visiting two important words that are repeated time and time again, but truly ignored by so many; “Slow down!!”

Consider making a big sign and displaying it in your office where you are forced to view it constantly with the following advice:

NOTHING SHOULD BE DONE IN MY BUSINESS UNLESS:

  • It makes a significant contribution to achieving worthwhile business goals;
  • It pays for itself in a reasonable and predictable time;
  • It can be explained simply and completely to those that have to make it work.

“Oh if it were only that simple” you say. Well consider putting it to the test with everything you do. When you keep these three items “in your face”, and answer the points honestly, it allows you to evaluate everything you handle and do, in proper perspective to YOUR particular function within the business. If what you are doing as an owner/manager doesn’t fit those rules, you either explain and delegate it to someone else to do, or throw it out and don’t waste your time with it.

Consider that December is a great month to “focus” on what really counts so you can get a proper self-discipline started to address 2018, that is, get yourself into a “daily routine” that maximizes your efforts to enhance your business profits; after all, that is your job, so don’t let yourself and your team down.

K&R Truck Sales Relies on 3M Automotive Aftermarket Division for a Cleaner, More Efficient Shop

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For nearly 30 years, K&R Truck Sales owner Ed Reitman has known only one way to service and repair trucks — the right way. And that’s why he relies on the 3M Automotive Aftermarket Division to provide his customers with the best quality work. K&R Truck Sales is a full-service truck dealership with locations in Holland, Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo and Muskegon, MI. Their Holland and Grand Rapids locations also feature full-service collision repair centers. All told, Reitman has 220 employees, including 28 who are dedicated to collision repair. With a total of 29,000 square feet, his two shops can handle anything from frame straightening, collision and mechanical repair, to cab replacement, wheelbase alterations and complete refinishing. K&R Truck Sales also offers full-service leasing, rentals and dedicated maintenance programs through Idealease. Also, emergency breakdown, towing and wrecker services are available 24 hours a day and 7 days a week. The business has grown substantially. In 2012, Reitman acquired West Michigan International and its three facilities in Grand Rapids, Kalamazoo and Muskegon. Just last year, K&R Truck Sales bought land in Kalamazoo to build a new facility while, earlier this year, the company acquired Pro-Fleet Refinishing in Matawan, MI, to add another body shop in the Kalamazoo market. All that growth meant finding a quality partner to work with was critical. Last year, K&R Truck Sales converted to all 3M products in their shops. With the help of the 3M team, Reitman was able to improve the efficiency and workflow of the collision repair side of his business.

“From an owner point of view, 3M demonstrated that looking for the lowest cost is not always the best way to do things,” said Reitman. “They assisted us in measuring our material cost and understanding how to use more efficient products and use less of them. We feel that is what makes a true partner in our business. 3M not only provides materials but they deliver technical support, training and a forward-thinking view that keeps us at the forefront in training and knowledge.” “When we visit a shop that is not yet using our products, it’s a great feeling knowing that 3M has solutions that can have a direct impact on improving their production,” said John Spoto, 3M National Heavy Duty Truck/Commercial Fleet Manager. “When we can help an owner like Ed Reitman boost his productivity, it will also have a positive impact on his bottom line.” One key component in the process is the Total Automotive Sanding System, which reduces the amount of dust in the air from sanding, leading to less rework, thus driving improved cycle time and process efficiency. It also reduces cleanup time, enhances workplace efficiency by reducing time spent searching for tools and materials, reduces material spending on abrasives and increases technician mobility. “Our goal is to provide the best and the quickest repair and turnaround for our customers so we continue to work on improving our process and flow through the shop,” said Reitman. “One of the tools that helps us accomplish that goal is the Total Automotive Sanding System. The cleanliness of the department is remarkable. Cleaner jobs and a cleaner atmosphere equate to less prep time, quicker re-assembly and cleaner, happier technicians.”

To that end, the Total Automotive Sanding System incorporates the benefits of 3M high-performance abrasives. Those benefits flow from Cubitron™ II abrasives that cut 30 percent faster and last up to twice as long as other premium abrasives; Trizact™ abrasives that leave a finer, more uniform finish; and Perfect-it™ Paint Finishing System, designed to provide a fast, swirl-free finish every time. With commitment and attention to detail, K&R Truck Sales and the 3M Automotive Aftermarket Division are working together to improve efficiency, customer satisfaction and quick turnarounds. It is a winning combination for sure.

For more information, visit 3MCollision.com/Truck.

Preventing Corroision After Collision Repairs Protects Profits, Performance for the Long Haul

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When a truck or commercial vehicle is manufactured, preventative measures are taken to resist corrosion over the life of that vehicle. These preventative measures come in the form of primers, sealers, and coatings along with various application and process methods. In the event of a collision, these protective materials can be compromised and need to be restored properly. Restoring the corrosion protection and being careful not to create new corrosion hot spots is the key to a proper repair.

When asked to identify the causes of corrosion on trucks today, the common responses are salt and corrosive chemicals, moisture or damaged coatings from stone chips. Most owner/operators and repair technicians don?t consider that collision repairs are commonly the cause of premature vehicle corrosion. Common processes such as grinding, welding and cutting in the truck collision repair process can create opportunities for corrosion. If these processes are not understood and addressed with proper repair methods and corrosion protection, it can lead to cosmetic consequences or, more importantly, compromised protection of structural parts which are critical to the safety of the truck.

What exactly is corrosion? Corrosion is an electrochemical reaction called oxidation that is formed when combining exposed metal, oxygen and an electrolyte such as an acid, salt or moisture. Galvanic corrosion is another type of corrosion that occurs when two dissimilar metals come together in contact with an electrolyte such as moisture.

When OEM coatings are damaged in an accident, it leaves bare metal exposed. Once bare metal is exposed, a corrosive hot spot can start to form on the exterior and interior panels by forming flash rusting. The corrosive hot spot can negatively affect rivet joints, weld joints, floor pan, cab corner extensions and reinforcement pillars. One such coating that could be compromised during the accident is the electrodeposition coating or known as ?E-Coat?. During the repair process it is very important to maintain or keep the E-Coat intact and to only remove this coating in the necessary locations.

Areas known as the seam sealer joints can be stressed in an accident resulting in distortion, twisting and damage. Seam sealers are designed to eliminate moisture, air intrusion and, in some situations, noise. Seam sealer joints should be thoroughly inspected after an accident to determine if the seam sealer has been damaged or compromised in any way.

Improper collision repairs can affect exterior and interior truck components. Heat is a promoter of corrosion and can be neglected during the repair process. Repair technicians need to keep in mind that they create heat through grinding, cutting and welding. Continuation of applied heat to surfaces can accelerate metals to high temperatures. When the metal cools, this can result in condensation or moisture. Even though the technician works on the outside of the panel during the repair process, the backside of the panel can be affected throughout the repair. The coating on the backside of the panel is usually compromised or even removed through hammering, pulling, dollies, stud weld pin inserts and even prying. This can leave the exposed metal susceptible to corrosion.

To restore the integrity of this coating when access to the backside is difficult or limited, use 3M? 08852 Cavity Wax Plus. This product will effectively coat and protect these areas from corrosion by sealing out oxygen from the metal. This is an easy-to-use aerosolized product that can be used with a variety of application wands. The 3M? Cavity Wax Plus Applicator Wand Kit 08851 contains and 8? wand for easy-to-access areas as well as two longer wands for accessing enclosed areas (frame rails, cab corners/supports).

Technicians need to keep in mind while working with bare metal that bare hands can leave behind salt, moisture and other contaminants. This neglected habit can also lead to corrosion. Wearing gloves and designating tools for specific metals can also help to reduce the potential for creating corrosion during the repair process.

Removing rivets during a heavy duty truck repair can also contribute to galvanic corrosion. For example, steel particles being removed from the substrate can get lodged into surrounding crevice areas. Also, high amounts of heat can be generated while grinding on these substrates which can lead to a potential corrosion hot spot. 3M? Cubitron? II sanding and grinding abrasives run cool during the rivet removal process due to consistent shape mineral and fast cutting action. This can help reduce the negative effect of heat during these applications.

The other area of concern during the riveting process is the reattachment point of the rivet. During the repair process the technician inserts coated steel rivets into an aluminum substrate. Even though a coating has been applied to the surface of the rivet, the coating could be scratched during the insert process leading to galvanic corrosion. This is why it?s important during the refinish process to completely coat the rivet on the backside of the panel or even apply 3M 08852 Cavity Wax Plus as added protection.

You can see how a neglected repair processes could potentially lead to corrosion. Neglecting corrosion protection can affect the life of the truck or possibly change the designed path of energy in the event of a future accident. 3M?s commitment to the commercial vehicle and heavy duty truck market help deliver solutions for corrosion protection as well as other challenges within the repair process.

For more information on heavy duty truck repair solutions from 3M Automotive Aftermarket Division, visit 3MCollision.com/HDtrucks.

>> Link to PDF version.

An Introduction to Paint Booth Filters & Maintenance

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The filters you choose for your truck refinish paint booth ? and how well you maintain them ? can have a direct impact on everything from booth efficiency and paint finish quality to booth maintenance costs and the safety of technicians. But before you select your booth filters, it?s important to understand all your booth?s filtration locations and the types of filters that can be used for each location.

Air Make-Up Filters
Depending on your paint booth setup, the first line of filtration defense may be in the air make-up unit, which provides pressurized air to the booth. These filters trap large particles before air reaches the air make-up unit. In addition to protecting the air make-up unit itself, these filters play an important role in extending the life of more expensive intake filtration further down the line. Relatively inexpensive, air make-up filters are sometimes known as a sacrificial layer.

Intake Filters
You likely wouldn?t know it because they are invisible to the naked eye, but particles as small as 10 microns can cause defects in your paint job. For reference, that?s about 0.0004 inches. A paint booth relies on high-quality intake filtration to remove these particles before they can contaminate the paint job.

Intake filters are often internally-supported polyester panel filters or linked panel filters, which are typically designed to be installed without the aid of clips or other mounting hardware to create a leak-free static fit when inserted into the frame. Your paint booth?s airflow style determines the type and efficiency of intake filter used.

Crossdraft Booths: In crossdraft booths, air is either pulled through a filtered intake door or pushed through a filtered intake plenum. Global Finishing Solutions® (GFS) supplies intake filters for crossdraft booths with a MERV (minimum efficiency reporting value) 7 rating, which is higher than the industry standard.

Side Downdraft, Semi-Downdraft and Downdraft Booths: Air is introduced into these booths through a filtered ceiling. The diffusion-type media pad used for ceiling intake filtration is much more efficient, with a rating of MERV 10 or higher. This rating ensures an internal cleanroom atmosphere that removes more than 99 percent of all particles 10 microns or larger from the air entering the booth.

Exhaust Filters
Where intake filters ensure that you are working with clean air from the start, exhaust filters ensure the air leaving the booth is safe for the environment, while also preventing potentially dangerous chemicals from remaining in the booth.

Exhaust filtration also protects your fans, exhaust stack and plenum from the buildup of overspray contamination. To do this effectively, exhaust filters need to hold enough paint to avoid constantly replacing them. At same time, these filters must provide a minimal pressure drop in the booth to ensure particles don?t harden and end up on the painted surface.

Traditional exhaust filters are generally single-stage filtration media made of multilayered polyester and/or fiberglass. Differences in fiber configuration, density and composition impact how exhaust filters will perform. With a 99.94 percent particle removal efficiency and holding capacity of 4.4 pounds, GFS Wave filters are designed to meet or exceed the performance of the original equipment filters.

The same type of exhaust filter can be used in crossdraft, side downdraft, semi-downdraft and downdraft booths but the location and frame configuration differ:

Crossdraft and Semi-Downdraft Booths: Exhaust filters are secured to the plenum located at the rear of the booth.

Side Downdraft Booths: Air is pulled into floor-level filtered exhaust plenums on both sides of the booth.

Downdraft Booths: Filters are located in the exhaust pit in the floor.

Filter Maintenance
Just as important as deciding which filters to use is establishing a regular schedule for changing your intake and exhaust filters. The cleanliness of your spray booth and the work you do within depend heavily on it. Clogged or overloaded filters may not allow proper airflow through the booth, causing dust or overspray to recirculate through the booth and affect the finish of your paint job.

Beyond that, it is also an important step in ensuring your paint operation meets the health and safety standards required by OSHA and NFPA regulations. In more severe situations, clogged filters may create flammable or explosive conditions within your booth.

Filters will reach their ?target? reading and require replacement at varying rates. These rates also depend upon the paint type, booth design, fan speed, temperature, spray equipment, etc. One way to establish a change-out schedule for exhaust filters is to compare readings from a manometer or magnehelic pressure gauge with the booth manufacturer?s specs. Without a pressure gauge, it is best to establish a strict maintenance schedule based on the volume of spraying taking place on a day-to-day basis.

Ultimately, it is best to work with your spray booth manufacturer or filter supplier to design an effective schedule for changing your filters that finds a good balance between filtration needs and cost efficiency in your booth?s performance. GFS and many of their distributors throughout North America offer preventative maintenance plans ? with quarterly, annual and just-in-time filter replacement offerings ? to take the hassle out of paint booth filter maintenance.

     

Road to Green: HD Vehicle Technology Will Change Labor Measurement

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The progression of heavy duty vehicle technology will make a dramatic difference in measuring a typical HD service shop business. The HD aftermarket will have to relearn this portion of the business all over again. You will find that a typical HD shop owner is going to require 6 to 8 days of management training per year moving forward. This labor measurement is one of the changes that will have to be relearned as the old way of setting and measuring labor rates will leave too much money on the table.

As commodity margins decline and HD vehicle software grows, everyone must understand where their management attention must be directed.

A redefined labor measurement will take place within the next year to maximum 2 year period.

A ?maintenance labor? category will be just that, pure maintenance work based on the manufacturers recommended service intervals and repairs of worn out or broken parts.

Diagnostic labor will be the analyzation of a situation or interpretation of information. (What is the problem, what caused it and what is the solution?)

Inspection labor will be all completed paid inspections.

Re-Flash will be strictly updating the vehicle from the OEM website.

Calibration labor will be a new category as the lining up of sensors after a repair has taken place will become an additional specialty skill within the HD shop. Software platforms will have to be understood.

The key information that will need to be understood is ?what will the mix of each labor category be within the shop?? This brings back the importance of key efficiency measurement for each category as specific training will have to be required and making sure the shop has the right skill set within the team to ensure professional execution of the services on behalf of the HD client. The efficiency measurement of each category will also help establish the billed hours per R/O.

Measuring the ?effective? rate will be critical in the labor mix measurement. How much labor should we be getting from each labor category to justify the staffing level?

All that being said another big change coming to the industry will be the setting of labor rates for each category. Labor rate multiples will change from what they are now based around the technicians hourly wage to working with the individual shops actual cost per billed hour.

Better ?job quoting? skills will have to be embraced because the knowledge for ?how? a job must be done and ?what kind of labor? is involved to complete the job to total client satisfaction must be learned.

As you can see, personnel development and business measurement will become more intertwined than ever before. All of these things combined will affect the net profit of the business.

Our heavy duty industry is changing so rapidly and dramatically and the reason for this is due to vehicle technology and technician competency that will be required to fix and maintain a vehicle properly.

I see this as just the beginning of so many changes coming to the heavy duty aftermarket sector within the next 1 to 2 years maximum. What will happen to the HD shops that don?t have a learning culture in their business or won?t want to re-learn and move in the direction they must? Time will not be on their side. It is this kind of change that will dramatically separate the heavy duty shops in a given marketplace.

As the business owner you want to be committed to keep ?ahead of the wave? and seek out the business knowledge you will need to keep the business moving forward. Hold on for the ride over the next 2 years, it will be a great one for the heavy duty shops that get it.

Bob Greenwood